Author Archives: jgilbert

Refocusing the blog

I will be focusing this blog now on a few topics that I have been pursuing for the last few years but never previously had the chance to write about:

  • How to put innovation to work, and how we see the nature of innovation in our everyday lives
  • Interesting new ideas I see coming down the pike in healthcare, information technology and informatics
  • Interesting news and tidbits in product management, healthcare/IT and technology

Since many of the older posts on this site have comments and public links, I decided to keep them around even though they don’t always fit into my new core themes. Be on the lookout for new posts soon!

Terrific online resources for photographers

Some terrific online resources for photographers:

Camera review and news

http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/index.asp – general camera news, some great links too

http://www.dpreview.com – One of the most detailed camera review sites on the planet

Photo blogs

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/ – terrific press shots

http://www.strobist.blogspot.com/ – great lighting techniques

http://digital-photography-school.com/ – great online tutorials

http://dptnt.com/ – random photography hacks

http://www.joemcnally.com/blog/ – Joe McNally, amazing pro; terrific blog

http://www.dphotojournal.com – Variety of useful info

A comparison of iPhone photo viewer / sync applications

I’m looking for the perfect iPhone application that will let me show my artistic and casual photography. My ideal qualifications:

– A great viewer / slideshow mode that supports autorotation, light zooming, an good overlay, etc
– A true sync (not a cache or a download) so I always have an “offline” copy of my photos
– Works with a good photo sharing service (picasaweb, flickr, etc)
– A solid UI that will act as a good showcase for my photos
– Intergrates with social media for both me and my guest viewers

To date, nothing like this exists, but I have started a preliminary google spreadsheet listing the apps currently on the market and how well they do.

iPhone: The unwatched pot never boils

cartoon-pipe-smoke-tea-kettle-whistling-its-time-readyThe blogosphere has long lamented the lack of background notifications on Apple’s iPhone, but will Apple’s iPhone 3.0 software really be a panacea its been cracked up to be? Sadly current reports suggest the next release will do nothing to fix an inherent limitation that many of us suffer: on the iPhone only one thing can happen at a time. Like an a small child lost in a solipsistic thrall, the iPhone can only download or process information for the currently running application.

For the iPhone, the unwatched pot never boils.

This limitation isn’t merely academic. For instance, if I open a page in Safari and then switch to a new tab, I expect the first tab to continue running and loading the page for me to read later. Instead, once I switch to the new page, the first one stays frozen in time. Or say I fire up NYTimes reader, but then check email before it finishes downloading all its articles; hours later when I’m stuck on an airplane I’ll have nothing to read. Data sharing apps like DataCase and MobileFiles only work when they are active and loaded. Voice recording applications stop recording when you switch to a new application.

Is this an inherent limitation of all mobile devices? My old Treo 650 could instant message and receive email at the same time. My blackberry lets me “Alt Tab” to another application and then return back to the first one. There shouldn’t be any reason why given a well-designed API that NYTimes Mobile can’t download new articles automatically once a day, or why Pandora has to stop playing once I leave the application.

Advanced tips for improving Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Performance

I use Adobe Lightroom as my primary image management software on both the PC and Macintosh. One of my persistent frustrations has been the “creeping slowness” issue, especially on an extended shoot. For instance, on day one of my trip to Africa last year, my catalog had about 8000 images and was nice and speedy. By day 10, my catalog had grown to 30000+ images, and I was cursing it’s slowness. Compacting the catalog didn’t seem to help.

After banging my head against this problem for about a year, I’ve discovered a number of surefire interventions, organized from simple to complex. Click on for more details.
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